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  • The Sleep Medicine Group of Sleep Centres: Sleep Disorders - Do you have a Sleep Problem? - Perform an online Sleep Assessment
    noticed changes in my personality True False 15 I am gaining weight True False 16 I sweat excessively during the night True False 17 I have noticed my heart pounding or beating irregularly during the night True False 18 I get morning headaches True False 19 I have trouble sleeping when I have a cold True False 20 I suddenly wake up gasping for breath during the night True False

    Original URL path: http://www.sleepclinic.co.za/sleep_disorders/online_questionnaire2.htm (2015-12-05)
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  • The Sleep Medicine Group of Sleep Centres: Sleep Disorders - Sleep FAQ
    disorder eg major depressive disorder generalized anxiety disorder delirium Disturbance is not due to the direct physiologic effects of a substance eg drug abuse medication or a general medical condition Psycho physiological insomnia The primary components involved are intermittent periods of stress which result in poor sleep and generate 2 maladaptive behaviours 1 a vicious cycle of trying harder to sleep and becoming tenser expressed as trying too hard to sleep and 2 bedroom and other sleep related activities eg brushing teeth conditioning the patient to frustration and arousal Bad sleep habits such as those naturally acquired during periods of stress occasionally are reinforced and therefore are prevented from extinction and become persistent Thus the insomnia continues for years after the stress has abated and is labelled persistent psycho physiological insomnia Idiopathic insomnia Lifelong sleeplessness is attributed to an abnormality in the neurological control of the sleep wake cycle involving many areas of the reticular activating system promoting wakefulness as well as areas such as solitary nuclei raphe nuclei and medial forebrain area promoting sleep Possibly a so called neuroanatomic neurophysiologic or neurochemical lesion exists in the sleep system in which patients tend to be on the extreme end of

    Original URL path: http://www.sleepclinic.co.za/sleep_disorders/sleep_faq_insomnia.htm (2015-12-05)
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  • The Sleep Medicine Group of Sleep Centres: Sleep Disorders - Sleep FAQ
    to get enough calcium through milk products for example A pounding heartbeat or shortness of breath is due to an increase in the volume of blood in the body If you are anaemic the heart must do more work in order to transport enough oxygen around the body Ask your doctor or midwife if an iron supplement might help The best resting position when pregnant is to lie on your side with your knees bent This makes the heart s job easier because it stops the weight of the baby applying pressure to your large veins which carry the blood back to the heart It is also much better for your lower back to lie on your side If you have pain in your lower back experiment with extra pillows to see how you can make yourself more comfortable when lying down For example try one pillow under your abdomen one between your legs a firm one behind your back and an extra pillow under your head Wanting to pass urine at night is common during pregnancy because the growing baby puts constant pressure on the bladder It is probably unavoidable but trying not to drink too much late in the evenings might help a little Avoid drinks containing caffeine such as tea coffee fizzy drinks since these stimulate your kidneys to produce more urine and are also mild mental stimulants It might also help to lie on your side instead of on your back If it hurts when you urinate you might have cystitis so take a sample of your urine to your doctor or midwife The bigger your baby becomes the more difficult it will be for you to turn over in bed If this is a real problem you could consider buying a turning sheet This is

    Original URL path: http://www.sleepclinic.co.za/sleep_disorders/sleep_faq_pregnancy.htm (2015-12-05)
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  • The Sleep Medicine Group of Sleep Centres: Sleep Disorders - Sleep FAQ
    the course of a few weeks an ounce at a time You can be confident that if your baby is at least 10 months of age unless they are ill or the weather is particularly hot they do not need a drink or food during the night If you give lots of milk at night you may find the baby eats less during the day and this will affect weaning If they are not coping with weaning very well it isn t a good idea to keep on giving the milk during the night because it will inhibit their hunger during the day which you need to stimulate in order to get them eating food The other thing is that there begins to be a crossover and instead of the milk being something comforting that sustains them throughout the night it becomes something uncomfortable for them rather in the way that eating a large heavy meal just before bedtime is for adults If you are breastfeeding you could try removing your nipple just as they appear to be falling asleep rather than waiting until they are and thereafter you could try removing it just a little earlier still It is worth allowing a few days at each stage of this change to allow them time to get used to it and waiting until they settle easily before you move onto the next stage If one stage doesn t work you can just go back to the previous one that you know worked and then try to move on again from there in a few days time My child screams when I try to leave the room If your child s screams when you try to leave the room and refuses to settle without you there are three main methods of dealing with this behaviour Cold turkey described by Richard Ferber in his book Solve your child s sleep problems This method simply involves ignoring your child s screams and not returning at all In behavioural terms it is known as extinction and it works very rapidly By very rapidly I mean that it will work within two to three days However it involves an awful lot of distress and screaming while children are learning that you will not respond as it is night time now and time for them to go to sleep The vast majority of parents that I see in the sleep clinic do not use this method because they find it too traumatic If they did use it they wouldn t be coming to see me because it does work very quickly However is not easy method to use and I would not suggest that anyone uses it with a child under 14 months of age because I think that they are simply too young to cope with it Normally parents recognise this Go back and check method but there are various names for it This is exactly as it sounds The idea is that you leave your baby after you have put them down settle to sleep and if they cry you wait five minutes before you go back to them Then you leave the room when they are settled again If they start to cry again there are two variations on the theme this point there is one method which says that after another five minutes you go back and that you keep doing that There is an alternative method which says that you leave it 10 minutes the next time and then you go back and that if your child s screams again you leave it 15 minutes the following time and so on always adding on five minutes rather than keeping it a constant The first of these variations adds the 5 minutes on the next night There are many people who swear by this method but I personally think it s a bit confusing It seems to me that just as your baby gets used to doing without you and begins to settle back you come again However there are many who swear by this method The last method is that you remain in the room with your child and you stay with them until they fall asleep This method is often very useful for parents where there have been concerns about separation or loss When I take a history of the pregnancy and birth and experiences before pregnancy from parents I find a striking number of parents who have had losses or threats of loss either just before the pregnancy sometime during the pregnancy or around the time of birth These experiences often sensitise parents to loss and make them far more anxious and unable to be calm around the separation time with their child Sleep is of course a separation and this may be the first time that you see this sort of underlying feeling becoming more evident This method depends on you sitting beside the bed cot while your child falls asleep and being very calm and very boring This will reinforce the idea that daytime is for playing and doing things and having conversations and night time is a rather boring uninteresting time when people lie still and do very little and have their eyes closed Try not to end up lying down with your child to get them to go to sleep but if you have somehow got into that situation as many parents do you have to gradually extricate yourself from this This might mean instead of lying down beside your child sitting beside them or sitting on a chair beside the bed sitting on a chair beside the door to your child s room although inside it etc These are also stages that you can go through to teach a small child gradually to learn to fall asleep without you Commonly when parents come to see me they have reached the point of lying down on a bed with their child and often falling asleep

    Original URL path: http://www.sleepclinic.co.za/sleep_disorders/sleep_faq_children.htm (2015-12-05)
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  • The Sleep Medicine Group of Sleep Centres: Sleep Disorders - Sleep FAQ
    Avoidance or at least decreasing the amount of alcohol especially close to bedtime is of great importance in managing sleep apnoea medically If the patient is on treatment such as CPAP then modest amounts of alcohol may be better tolerated Hypothyroidism low thyroid hormone Untreated hypothyroidism has been associated with OSA This may be due to the body changes the size of the thyroid gland or the effects of low thyroid hormone on breathing pattern Treatment may help but usually the improvement is not enough to completely treat OSA and eliminate the need for other treatment Electrical Stimulation of the Upper Airway Since OSA occurs when the muscle tone in the throat pharynx is not strong enough to hold the airway open it would seem logical that if the muscles were stimulated the apnoea would be corrected There is promising research in this area which does suggest this may be the case Unfortunately no device is readily available for clinical use yet Nasal Dilators Since resistance to airflow in the nose increases airway collapse in OSA reducing nasal obstruction would seem likely to help Several devices that dilate the nose both internal and external are available While they seem to help some snorers no significant consistent benefit for sleep apnoea has been seen Medication Antidepressants have been tried for sleep apnoea None has proven to consistently or completely treat OSA though some improvement is sometimes seen in the severity of apnoeic episodes There is ongoing interest in finding a medication that would help but no immediate choice is available now Continuous Positive Airway Pressure CPAP CPAP involves the delivery of air not oxygen under pressure to the pharynx This pressure acts as an air splint holding the airway open and preventing the partial or complete collapse that is the main event in OSA Usually this is delivered through a mask that fits over the nose only In almost all cases this eliminates the signs and symptoms of OSA as well as the snoring Most patients get relief quickly some the first night they use it In others it may take 1 2 weeks to adapt to the sensation of using the machine CPAP was first used in Australia in 1981 The major difficulty then and now was devising a mask to fit comfortably but snugly over the nose Since the first masks a great deal of research has gone in to finding comfortable masks There are now a variety of masks of different designs and different materials Most still fit over the nose but some are designed to fit into the nasal opening These are particularly helpful if you have any degree of claustrophobia Because some patients cannot adapt to nasal breathing masks that fit over both the nose and mouth are also available There are also newer units which actually adjust the amount of pressure as needed throughout the night For some people this is more comfortable Another choice for difficult cases particularly for those with more severe OSA

    Original URL path: http://www.sleepclinic.co.za/sleep_disorders/sleep_faq_osa.htm (2015-12-05)
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  • The Sleep Medicine Group of Sleep Centres: Sleep Disorders - Do you have a Sleep Problem? - Perform an online Sleep Assessment
    I go around in a daze True False 28 I have fallen asleep during physical effort True False 29 I feel like I am hallucinating when I fall asleep True False 30 I have fallen asleep when laughing or crying True False 31 I have trouble at work because of sleepiness True False 32 I have vivid dreams soon after falling asleep True False 33 I fall asleep during the

    Original URL path: http://www.sleepclinic.co.za/sleep_disorders/online_questionnaire3.htm (2015-12-05)
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  • The Sleep Medicine Group of Sleep Centres: Sleep Disorders - Do you have a Sleep Problem? - Perform an online Sleep Assessment
    37 I have a chronic cough True False 38 I have to use antacids Rolaids Tums Alka Seltzer etc almost every week for stomach trouble True False 39 I have morning hoarseness True False 40 I wake up at night coughing or wheezing True False 41 I have frequent sore throats True False 42 During the night I suddenly wake up gasping for breath True False Score If you scored

    Original URL path: http://www.sleepclinic.co.za/sleep_disorders/online_questionnaire4.htm (2015-12-05)
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  • The Sleep Medicine Group of Sleep Centres: Sleep Disorders - Do you have a Sleep Problem? - Perform an online Sleep Assessment
    that parts of my body jerk True False 45 I have been told that I kick at night True False 46 I experience aching or crawling sensations in my legs True False 47 I experience leg pain during the night True False 48 Sometimes I can t keep my legs still at night I just have to move them True False 49 I awaken with sore or achy muscles True

    Original URL path: http://www.sleepclinic.co.za/sleep_disorders/online_questionnaire5.htm (2015-12-05)
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